Implementation Brief

Implementation Brief

Implementing Competency 11: Working with Communities and Systems

Image showing a diverse workforceSelf-assessment is considered to be a major component of learning in public health.1 It provides an opportunity for health professionals to reflect on competency-based strengths and weaknesses in order to identify learning needs and reinforce new skills or behaviors in order to improve performance. The MCH Navigator has been collecting data from our online Self-Assessment for five years and during that time have identified a number of data trends. 

With over 2,000 completed assessments in the database, learners consistently report high levels of knowledge but low levels of skills across cultural competency. This translates into MCH professionals having high levels of understanding of this competency but not as much self-efficacy in translating this knowledge into practice. In response to this need, the MCH Navigator has developed this implementation brief that provides specific learning opportunities that focus on how to implement and execute skills associated with cultural competency. 

Trainings from the MCH Navigator

Image indicating that you can click on the image to watch a video explaining the implementation briefAs part of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI), a network of US-based non-governmental organizations (NGOs) convened between 1997-2001 and through multiple meetings and workshops developed a descriptive implementation framework for household and community integrated management of childhood illnesses. Utilizing three elements of action, this framework is easily adaptable to the MCH Leadership Competency: Working with Communities and Systems and is an ideal tool for describing, sharing and coordinating efforts in the field.2

View each of the three elements of action below and corresponding learning opportunities for: 1) Improving partnerships between health facilities and the communities they serve, 2) Increasing promotion of appropriate and accessible health care and information from community-based providers, and 3) Integrating practices focused on families critical for maternal and child health.


References

  1. Sujata, B., Oliveras, E., and Edson, W.N. (2001). How Can Self-Assessment Improve the Quality of Healthcare?  Operations Research Issue Paper 2(4). Published for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) by the Quality Assurance (QA) Project.
  2. Winch PJ, Leban K, Casazza L, Walker L, Pearcy K. An implementation framework for household and community integrated management of childhood illness. Health Policy and Planning; 17(4): 345-353

Working with Communities and Systems: Implementation Brief
August 2018
Authors: Keisha Watson, Ph.D., MCH Navigator
Reviewers: Faculty and staff of the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.